Unpaid Time

The law generally requires employers to pay employees for all the time they work, including during lunch or outside normal hours. If you were not paid for all the time you worked, contact Tim to review your legal options.

Looking for an Unpaid Wages Lawyer? You have come to the right place.

The federal Fair Labor Standards Act requires employers to pay most hourly employees, and all non-exempt employees (including certain salaried employees), an overtime premium for all hours worked over 40 in a workweek.

Importantly, hours worked means all time an employer “suffers or permits” employees to work. This can include time that is not recorded on the time clock or on your timesheet. “Suffer or permit” means that if the employer requires or allows you to work, or knew or should have known you were working, your employer generally has to pay you for that time. If the employer could not have known you were working, a court might find the time is not compensable.

Unpaid time adds up quickly. It can make a big difference in how much pay or overtime compensation your employer owes you.

While ideally an employee will have some documentary evidence of the unpaid time (“off the clock”) worked, like emails or phone records, that kind of evidence is not necessary. An employee may still seek compensation for unpaid time without documentary evidence, by providing a good faith estimate of the unpaid time worked.

Here are some examples of typical unpaid time problems that often result in wage law violations:

  • An employer requires employees to clock out at 5:30pm but requires or allows employees to continue working after clocking out;
  • An employer alters time records to avoid paying for all hours worked or to reduce overtime pay to employees;
  • An employer only pays employees for hours they are scheduled to work, even though employees work more hours;
  • An employer does not pay employees for time they work outside regular working hours when the employer knew or should have known they were working;
  • An employer alters time records to avoid paying for all hours worked or to reduce overtime pay to employees;
  • An employer requires employees to clock out for lunch, but allows employees to work through lunch.

Let us help you!

Contact Tim today for a consultation.



Discrimination & HarassmentRetaliation & WhistleblowingWages & OvertimeEmployment ContractsNoncompetes & Restrictive CovenantsSeverance AgreementsEmployee Advice & Counseling

Call : (1)2345-2345-5

Attorney Tim Coffield fights to make sure employees are paid all for all the time they work. If you believe that you have been denied compensation for time you worked, contact Tim to discuss a possible legal claim.

info@coffieldlaw.com