Category

Copyright
In Campbell v. Acuff-Rose Music, 510 U.S. 569 (1994), the Supreme Court distinguished between “parody” and “satire” as follows: For the purposes of copyright law, the nub of the definitions, and the heart of any parodist’s claim to quote from existing material, is the use of some elements of a prior author’s composition to create a...
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Techdirt asks: Can A Monkey License Its Copyrights To A News Agency? and David Post explains why the answer must be yes.   Apparently, David Slater, a well-known nature photographer, left his camera on the ground in an Indonesian national park, and a macaque monkey walked over and snapped a bunch of photos, including this (remarkable!) self-portrait:...
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  Musicians! Check out this survey from the Future of Music Coalition.  The study tracks artist revenue streams in the post-Napster era, and captures the ways in which US musicians generate income from songs, recordings, or performances. Obviously, this is not your grandpa’s music industry.  The past ten years transformed the ways in which music created...
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A new copyright and trademark parody case, CCA and B, LLC v. F + W Media, Inc. (N.D. Ga. Sept. 22, 2011), finds that the parody Elf off the Shelf  likely does not infringe the copyright or trademark in plaintiff’s Elf on the Shelf.
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