Employment Law Blog

In Darveau v. Detecon, Inc., 515 F.3d 334 (4th Cir. 2008), the Fourth Circuit held that an employee could be protected by the anti-retaliation provision of the Fair Labor Standards Act when a former employer responded to the employee’s...
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In United States v. Silk, 331 U.S. 704 (1947), the Supreme Court applied a multi-factor test for determining whether workers were independent contractors or employees. The case is important because, inter alia, these “Silk factors” came to be applied in...
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The Fair Labor Standards Act requires covered employers to pay minimum wages and overtime compensation to certain categories of employees. These requirements involve a determination as to the employee’s regular or overtime hourly rate of pay. As explained below, FLSA...
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In Rutherford Food Corp. v. McComb, 331 U.S. 722 (1947), the Supreme Court held that the meat boners working in a slaughterhouse, who worked under a contract, owned their own tools, and were paid collectively based on their production,...
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The Fair Labor Standards Act requires covered employers to pay minimum wages and overtime compensation to certain categories of employees. These requirements involve a determination as to the number of hours an employee “works” each workweek. As explained below, the...
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Recent Articles

FLSA Outside Sales Employee Exemption: Primary Duty of Sales and Regularly Engaged Away from Employer’s Place of Business
February 6, 2024
Citicorp v. Brock: FLSA Hot Goods Provision Applies to Secured Creditors
February 6, 2024
Groff v. DeJoy: Employers Must Show Substantial Increased Costs to Defend Denial of Religious Accommodation as Undue Hardship
January 8, 2024

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